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Showing posts with label Rohingya. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rohingya. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Rohingya Influx Next to NCR Demands Home Ministry and NIA’s Full Security Attention

NEWS 18

K Yatish Rajawat
October 12, 2021, 

The Tablighi Jamaat, which was founded in Nuh district in Haryana but has expanded globally, could be facilitating the entry of Rohingyas into the region.

 The airport in Delhi is a few kilometers away from the millennium city of Gurgaon, and just 50 kilometers from the millennium city is the district of Nuh (Mewat). Despite its proximity to Delhi, the district has the dubious distinction of being the only backward district of Haryana; the callousness now extends to security matters. The district has been witnessing a continuous, rising influx of Rohingya immigrants in the last few years, yet the district administration, while being aware of this influx, is limited in its action and can do little to prevent it.

There is a perception about the district built by the administrators in Gurgaon—that it is a den of criminals. This baseless perception has done immense harm to the development, and even to the security, of the district. The national media also picks up selective stories about the district based on this perception.

Rohingyas were promised a new home in Bangladesh. They are now trying to escape it

New York Times
By Saif Hasnat, Sameer Yasir,
Oct 11, 2021,

Buildings meant to accommodate Rohingya refugees at Bhasan Char, Bangladesh, in the Bay of Bengal.Credit...Mahmud Hossain Opu/Associated Press

They Were Promised a New Home. Then They Tried to Escape It. 

Bangladesh is relocating Rohingya refugees who fled Myanmar to a vulnerable, environmentally unstable island that is giving some cause to run again.

DHAKA, Bangladesh — Its name translates into “floating island,” and for up to 100,000 desperate war refugees, the low-slung landmass is supposed to be home.

One refugee, Munazar Islam, initially thought it would be his. He and his family of four fled Myanmar in 2017 after the military there unleashed a campaign of murder and rape that the United Nations has called ethnic cleansing. After years in a refugee camp prone to fires and floods, he accepted an invitation from the government of neighboring Bangladesh to move to the island, Bhasan Char.

Wednesday, October 6, 2021

More U.S. Aid for the Rohingya Refugee Crisis

VOA
EDITORIALS POLICY FOUCUS
October 6th'2021

The United States will contribute nearly $180 million in additional assistance for the humanitarian crisis facing Rohingya in and outside of Burma, and affected host communities in neighboring Bangladesh.

Link : Here

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

PM Hasina: UNGA discussion will help continue international pressure for Rohingya repatriation

Dhaka Tribune

BSS
October 4th, 2021



She hopes Bangladesh delegation's participation in the session would strengthen Dhaka's position in the multilateral forum

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina on Monday said international pressure on Myanmar would continue for a permanent solution to the protracted Rohingya crisis as the issue was widely discussed in the 76th United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) session.

She said: "The issue of the Rohingya crisis and its permanent solution was discussed elaborately in the UNGA session which I believe will help to continue global pressure on Myanmar for bringing back their Rohingya nationals from Bangladesh."

Thursday, September 30, 2021

Rohingya Civil-Rights Leader Mohib Ullah Killed in Bangladesh

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
Feliz Soloman
Sept. 30, 2021

Human-rights advocates call for investigation after he was shot dead in refugee camp 

A leader of the Rohingya Muslim community was shot and killed by unidentified gunmen in a refugee camp in Bangladesh, prompting calls from rights advocates for an investigation.

Mohib Ullah, who his colleagues say was 48 years old, was among the most high-profile advocates for the Rohingya, a stateless minority from Myanmar that was targeted in a 2017 military offensive that forced more than 740,000 to flee to neighboring Bangladesh. United Nations investigators have called for Myanmar army leaders to face genocide charges over the attacks.

The Invisible Wounds of the Rohingya

THE I DIPLOMAT
By Ana Salvá
September 30, 2021


The situation in the refugee camps has worsened over the years, causing irreversible damage to the mental health of their inhabitants.


Zaifur Hussein, 50, managed to escape the fire that swept through the Cox’s Bazar refugee camps in March, but he lost his home. While taking refuge with friends, Hussein witnessed dozens of people dying – and how the fences around the camps made it difficult to get out.

Hussein’s story was one of those shared by Reuters news agency in its coverage of the disaster. The March 2021 fire had a devastating effect on these camps, where more than a million refugees live in southern Bangladesh. Black smoke billowed over burning huts and tents as people scrambled to retrieve their possessions.

Rohingya community leader shot dead in Bangladesh refugee camp

REUTERS
By Ruma Paul and Poppy Mcpherson
September 29, 2021

Mohib Ullah, a leader of Arakan Rohingya Society for Peace and Human Rights, talks on the phone in Kutupalong camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh April 7, 2019. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain


Sept 29 (Reuters) - Gunmen shot and killed a prominent Rohingya Muslim leader in a refugee camp in southern Bangladesh on Wednesday, a United Nations spokesperson and a local police official said, following months of worsening violence in the world's largest refugee settlement.

Mohib Ullah, who was in his late 40s, led one of the largest of several community groups to emerge since more than 730,000 Rohingya Muslims fled Myanmar after a military crackdown in August 2017.

Thursday, September 2, 2021

FOUR YEARS ON, ROHINGYA STUCK IN BANGLADESH CAMPS YEARN FOR HOME

Wisconsin Muslim Journal 
Aug 31, 2021
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED BY
Aljazeera

PHOTO CREDIT: FAISAL MAHMUD/AL JAZEERA
Mohammad Islam, who lost his younger brother at the hands of the Myanmar military, said he is thankful to the Bangladeshi government for providing shelter.


Dhaka/Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh – Early last month, Rakibul Alam’s makeshift home built of blue tarpaulin and bamboo turned into a muddy mess when heavy monsoon rain hit southern Bangladesh.

Alam, his wife and their three children withstood knee-deep water inside their home for two days but were forced to evacuate when the fragile roof fell in due to excessive downpours.

The 35-year-old Rohingya refugee has changed home thrice in the past four years and learned to live inside shacks in one of the 34 refugee camps – together forming the world’s single largest refugee camp – in Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar bordering Myanmar.

The Rohingya's Quest for International Justice

THE WIRE
ANAYLIS
Saumya Uma
30/AUG/2021
This is the third in a series of articles on the International Criminal Court (ICC). The Rome Statute creating the ICC entered into force on July 1, 2002 and the court is now in its 20th year. To mark the occasion, The Wire is publishing a series of articles evaluating its performance over the past two decades. Read the first part here and the second part here.

The situation faced by the Rohingya is once again in the spotlight with the Bangladesh government reportedly commencing the COVID vaccination drive for Rohingya refugees on one hand and the Indian government terming them “a threat to national security” on the other. Last month, the Human Rights Watch minced no words in asking the Indian government to release the detained asylum seekers.

Friday, August 27, 2021

Four Years After Massacres and Purge, Sympathy for the Rohingya Grows in Myanmar

Radio Free Asia
2021-08-25

Many now see the Myanmar military, which has killed over a thousand protesters and other civilians since the Feb. 1 coup, as a common enemy.

Rohingya refugees walk along a path at Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhia, Bangladesh, Aug. 25, 2021.
AFP

Four years after the Myanmar military attacked ethnic Rohingya communities in the country’s western Rakhine state, burning villages, killing residents, and driving hundreds of thousands as refugees across the border with Bangladesh, sympathy has grown for the Muslim minority, sources in the country say.

The military’s 2017 scorched earth campaign launched in response to attacks by Muslim insurgents against police posts in Rakhine, has since been described by international rights groups and foreign governments as constituting acts of “genocide” and “crimes against humanity.”

Thursday, August 26, 2021

We must focus on building Rohingya and host community resilience

The Daily Star
Robert Chatterton Dickson
Wed Aug 25, 2021 
Rohingya refugees stretch their hands to receive aid distributed by local organisations at Balukhali makeshift refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, September 14, 2017. Photo: Reuters/Danish Siddiqui


This month marks the fourth year since the flight of more than 730,000 Rohingya from Myanmar's Rakhine State to Bangladesh after a military-led crackdown. The exodus followed decades of systemic disenfranchisement, discrimination, targeted violence and persecution against the Rohingya in Myanmar.

Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Citizenship of the Rohingya in Myanmar: A historical account

The Daily Star
Md Khalid Rahman
Tue Aug 24, 2021

While the international stakeholders and the Government of Bangladesh have tried for their safe and dignified voluntary return of the Rohingya refugees as per the agreement between Bangladesh and Myanmar, the citizenship issue became one of the crucial contesting conditions. Unfortunately, no government of Myanmar, after the mischievous power-grabbing of the then Burma by the military government led by General Ne Win has responded positively to the citizenship issue of the Rohingya. The present article argues that the citizenship crisis is rooted in the British colonial era that consequently gained momentum through the political demarcation and marginalisation of different ethnicity including Rohingya.

Myanmar Army Probe: Rohingyas to testify before Argentina court

The Daily Star
Afp, Yangon
Wed Aug 18, 2021 

Rohingya refugees expelled from Myanmar in a bloody crackdown were set to testify in a court in Argentina for the first time yesterday to urge a full judicial investigation into allegations of war crimes committed against them.

A military campaign in Myanmar in 2017 is believed to have killed thousands and forced some 750,000 members of the Muslim minority to flee to refugee camps in Bangladesh, bringing accounts of rape, murder and arson.


The witnesses will testify remotely to a court in Argentina, which is considering invoking the principle of "universal jurisdiction" to bring a case against Myanmar's leaders for genocide and crimes against humanity.

Friday, August 20, 2021

Bangladesh Recovers Refugees' Bodies From Sunken Rohingya Boat

RFA
Radio Free Asia
2021-08-18
Roh Sana Ullah, 35, lies in a room after being rescued a day earlier from a boat that sank in the Bay of Bengal, Aug. 15, 2021.
AP

Bangladeshi authorities said Wednesday they had recovered the bodies of 11 Rohingya who drowned in the Bay of Bengal after their boat capsized in bad weather as they tried to escape from an island housing refugees over the weekend.

A search was going on for 15 other Rohingya still missing from the boat after it sank off Bhashan Char Island on Saturday, said Lt. M. Abdur Rauf, a Coast Guard public relations officer. Twelve others were rescued by local fishermen, who brought the survivors back to the island later that day.

“Seven bodies including six minors were recovered from the Chittagong part of the sea on Tuesday while four other bodies were recovered two days earlier,” Abdur Rauf told BenarNews, an RFA-affiliated online news service, adding he did not know when joint rescue efforts by the Coast Guard, Navy, and police would end or if they would be changed to a recovery mission.

Rohingya women testify in Argentina court on ‘brutal massacre in Rakhine state’

The Daily Star
Wed Aug 18, 2021
Rohingya refugee girls are seen at Kutupalong refugee camp in Cox's Bazaar, Bangladesh. Photo: Anisur Rahman/ Star file


In a historic development, Rohingya women have described how the Myanmar military carried out a brutal massacre in their village, in an Argentinean court of law, under the aegis of universal jurisdiction.

Speaking remotely to the Federal Criminal Appeals Court in Buenos Aires from Cox's Bazar on Tuesday, the women told how soldiers killed their husbands in Chuk Pyin, Rakhine, Myanmar, according to a statement from the Burmese Rohingya Organization UK (BROUK).

Argentine Court: Rohingyas testify about the horrors they faced

The Daily Star
Diplomatic Correspondent
Thu Aug 19, 2021 

In a historic development for Myanmar, Rohingya women have described in an Argentine court of law, under the aegis of universal jurisdiction, how the Myanmar military carried out a brutal massacre in their village.

Speaking remotely to the Federal Criminal Appeals Court in Bueno Aires from the world's largest refugee camp in Cox's Bazar on Tuesday, the women spoke of how soldiers killed their husbands in Chuk Pyin of Myanmar's Rakhine, according to a statement from the Burmese Rohingya Organization UK (BROUK).


They said soldiers killed hundreds of people, while some women were raped before being killed. The soldiers went on to rape many other women in their village and then burned their homes to the ground.

Rohingya to give first testimony in push for Myanmar army probe

Frontier Myanmar
AFP
AUGUST 18, 2021
The President of The Burmese Rohingya Organisation UK , Tun Khin (L) and Argentine human rights lawyer Tomas Ojea Quintana (R) leave Argentine federal court in Buenos Aires on November 13, 2019. (AFP)


Rohingya refugees expelled from Myanmar in a bloody crackdown are to testify in court for the first time Tuesday to urge a full judicial investigation into allegations of war crimes committed against them.

A military campaign in Myanmar in 2017 is believed to have killed thousands and forced some 750,000 members of the Muslim minority to flee to refugee camps in Bangladesh, bringing accounts of rape, murder and arson.

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Rohingya to give first testimony in push for Myanmar army probe

THE STRAITS TIMES
17 August 2021

A photo from Sept 10, 2017, showing a Rohingya refugee pulling a child as they walk to the shore in Shah Porir Dwip, Bangladesh.PHOTO: REUTERS

YANGON (AFP) - Rohingya refugees expelled from Myanmar in a bloody crackdown are to testify in court for the first time on Tuesday (Aug 17) to urge a full judicial investigation into allegations of war crimes committed against them.

A military campaign in Myanmar in 2017 is believed to have killed thousands and forced some 750,000 members of the Muslim minority group to flee to refugee camps in Bangladesh, bringing accounts of rape, murder and arson.

The witnesses will testify remotely to a court in Argentina, which is considering invoking the principle of "universal jurisdiction" to bring a case against Myanmar's leaders for genocide and crimes against humanity. The legal premise holds that some acts - including war crimes and crimes against humanity - are so horrific they are not specific to one nation and can be tried anywhere.

Rohingya to give testimony to Argentine court in push for Myanmar Army probe

BuenosAires Times
17 August 2021

Rohingya refugees expelled from Myanmar in a bloody crackdown are to testify before Argentine court. They will use the principle of "universal jurisdiction" to urge a full judicial investigation into allegations of war crimes committed against them. 

TUN KHIN, PRESIDENT OF THE BURMESE ROHINGYA ORGANISATION UK, PREPARES TO GIVE TESTIMONY. | TWITTER.COM/TUNKHIN80

Rohingya refugees expelled from Myanmar in a bloody crackdown are to testify in court for the first time Tuesday to urge a full judicial investigation into allegations of war crimes committed against them.

A military campaign in Myanmar in 2017 is believed to have killed thousands and forced some 750,000 members of the Muslim minority to flee to refugee camps in Bangladesh, bringing accounts of rape, murder and arson.

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Rohingya Boat Capsize: UNHCR ready to support rescue work

The Daily Star
Unb, Dhaka
Mon Aug 16, 2021 

NHCR, the UN refugee agency, has said it is in contact with Rohingya communities both on Bhasan Char and in Cox's Bazar to support further rescue efforts following Saturday's boat capsize in Bay of Bengal.

On the morning of August 14, UNHCR was alerted that a boat carrying dozens of Rohingyas had capsized close to Bhasan Char island overnight.

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